About
HOLT VILLAGE

ABOUT HOLT

Holt Village

Holt is situated in North East Wales, part of the Welsh Marches, and sits on the banks of the River Dee. The Dee at this point marks the boundary between Wales and England and Holt Bridge was an important border crossing for centuries.

In 1282 Holt (also known as Villa Leonis or Lyons) was founded as an English town when lands were granted to John de Warrenne who built Holt Castle following the failed rebellion of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd.

Over the years, history has left its mark on the village in many forms including holes in the door of St. Chad’s church, caused by musket shot during the English Civil War.

Further information can be found on the Wikipedia website.

We also have an iBeacon Trail as part of the North East Wales App. Click this link for more information.

We have reproduced below and artilce by P.H.W. Booth, M.A., F.R.Hist.S., given with his kind permission.

Holt Village

Holt is situated in North East Wales, part of the Welsh Marches, and sits on the banks of the River Dee. The Dee at this point marks the boundary between Wales and England and Holt Bridge was an important border crossing for centuries.

In 1282 Holt (also known as Villa Leonis or Lyons) was founded as an English town when lands were granted to John de Warrenne who built Holt Castle following the failed rebellion of Llywelyn ap Gruffydd.

Over the years, history has left its mark on the village in many forms including holes in the door of St. Chad’s church, caused by musket shot during the English Civil War.

Further information can be found on the Wikipedia website.

We also have an iBeacon Trail as part of the North East Wales App. Click this link for more information.

We have reproduced below and artilce by P.H.W. Booth, M.A., F.R.Hist.S., given with his kind permission.

Facts about Holt Village

There are 1,451 households in the village (up from 1,136 in 2001).

74.1% of the population are owner / occupiers, 9.8% rented from social landlord and 16.1% other rented
The average household size is 2.45 persons.

Detached houses make up 46.2% of households; 27.5% are semi-detached; 17.9% terraced and 4.3% are flats.

Only 1.4% have no central heating and 11.1% have no car.

The total population in the ward of Holt has grown as follows:
1991 = 2,026
2001 = 2,828 (40% increase)
2011 = 3,587 (27% increase)

Total population = 3,587
Of these, 356 speak, read and write in Welsh. 2,182 have no knowledge of Welsh at all.

Of the 2,599 people aged between 16 and 74, 77% are economically active, 5.2% are unemployed, 23% are economically inactive and 12% are long term sick / disabled.

(Unemployment comparisons: Wrexham = 6.8%; Wales = 8.2%; UK = 7.8%)

Managerial and professional = 32%
Skilled = 34.6%
Part / unskilled = 24%
Students & other = 9.4%

There is a good mix of people of most socio-economic classifications although the biggest group (marginally) are the skilled workers. Manufacturing is the dominant employer followed by wholesale / retail trades and health & social work.

Most people classify themselves as having good to very good health.

Of the 1,451 households in the community,
161 have none
562 have one
538 have two
140 have three
50 have four or more.

Total number of vehicles is 2,276.

Of people aged 16 – 74 in employment, most people drive to work (1,415) or are passengers in a car (104) but there is also a reasonable number who work from home (118). More people now get the bus than in 2011 (49, up from 25) and 32 use a bicycle (was 28 in 2001).
We also have 131 people who walk to work.
Interestingly, 11 people use a train to get to work and 2 use underground / metro / light rail / tram!

Sourced from Wrexham Council’s website and based on 2011 census:

http://old.wrexham.gov.uk/english/statistics/wrexham_statistics/census.htm

About Holt Bridge

From the paper written by P.H.W. Booth, M.A., F.R.Hist.S., he calculates that the bridge over the Dee at Holt was completed in 1353.

Built of local red sandstone in regular courses, it consists of nine arches. The third arch from the Welsh side has two arch rings, and was the location of the gatehouse and drawbridge which defended the town of Holt. This arch was known as the Lady’s arch as it was the site of a chapel dedicated to Our Lady.

The bridge was of strategic importance during the Civil War. A fierce battle was fought here in 1643 which resulted in the capture of both bridge and town by Parliamentarian forces, though the castle remained in Royalist hands.

Find out more about holt castle

Holt Local History Society’s successful March, 2015 lecture on Holt Castle was given by Dr Rick Turner, formerly of Cadw. He gave a fascinating talk with a set of animated illustrations re the building of Holt Castle and its internal room layouts which he pieced together from all the available evidence.

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Find out more about holt castle

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